For those not directly involved it might not seem possible that a year has passed since the terror attack, time flies until you are grieving. Then the opposite is true, time moves incredibly slowly when loss overtakes you. 
We define grief as the conflicting feelings following a change or end in a familiar pattern of behaviour. We grieve all loss, yes loss of life but also loss of health & the more intangible losses of loss of safety, loss of security, loss of hopes dreams and expectations. All grief is unique, just as all relationships are unique. This point is important as if we don’t acknowledge that the conflicting feelings are grief then the right help can’t be found. 
There is something about anniversaries that can bring back all the unresolved fears, anxieties, anger, pain, so it can feel as if it only happened yesterday. In the case of events like terror attacks this is exacerbated by the press bringing it all back. So, what can you do to support young people who are struggling today? 
sad girl holding giant teddy bear
From talking to hundreds of grievers we know that many feel pressurised to return to work far sooner than they are ready. The biggest considerations are financial. Employers are obliged to offer compassionate leave but it doesn't have to be paid. 
 
As a result of all these conversations and government actions/inactions in this area we have launched a petition asking that there should be statuatory 2 weeks paid leave available for those who experience the death of a spouse. 
 
Currently the average time off awarded to an employee after a major bereavement is just 3 days. Even 2 weeks is incredibly short, given that in England, many funerals don't take place until 2 weeks or more after a death.  
 
In November 2017 a private members bill which will mean statutory bereavement leave for those who have a child die had it's first reading. It is expected to become law by 2020. This is an excellent step forward from the goverment position in 2013 where they shied away from legistating saying it was "too complicated."  
 
At Grief Recovery we recognise that all grief is unique & 
 
 
As the Duchess of Cambridge supported the start of Children's Mental Health Week this morning with her message for children to be comfortable in their own skin, Grief Recovery's UK Director Carole Henderson was quoted in Metro talking about equipping teachers and parents with the tools to support kids in their care effectively. 
The Helping Children Deal with Loss programme is based on the best selling book "When Children Grieve" by Grief Recovery founder John W James and then Executive Director of the Grief Recovery Institute the late Russell Friedman. Originally written for parents it is now being additionally offered to schools as we've found that it is an area that even teachers let alone teaching assistants or other support staff receive any training on. Feedback from participating schools has been tremendous encouraging even more people to train to be a Grief Recovery Specialist so they can facilitate the programme for themselves. Specialist Catherine Best who has a background in Education and is highly experienced in helping schools embed the lessons of the Helping Children Deal with Loss programme says "What makes us unique is that we equip everyone who does the programme with practical skills that they can implement right away. Too many schemes offer lots of theory. I love the Grief Recovery Helping Children Programme because we teach them what to say, what not to say and do.  
Vacancy for Office / Marketing/ Personal Assistant at our Cambridgeshire Office. 
 
We have been expanding rapidly over the last few years as more people are finding out that there is a genuine alternative to counselling and therapy for emotional loss. This means we have created a new full time role to assist Carole manage this continued success. Full details and application form are on this page of the website - please share with anyone you know who might like to apply.  
 
Nicky Clifford with her son Flynn
Hi, I’m Nicky and I’m thrilled Carole has asked me to tell my story. When I read The Grief Recovery Handbook I felt like the writers had read my mind! I told all my friends `this book makes COMPLETE sense to me` and I felt inspired to use my experience to help others.” 
 
Nicky’s experience was horrific. In September 2013, she was taking her sons to school when a car collision killed her 11 year old son Flynn. Her other son Dylan aged 15 who was also in the car survived with bruises. It was 7 months before she returned to work, suffering PTSD and flashbacks. 
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